Sasha Moldovan (1901-1982), Street Scene, Oil on Board

Sasha Moldovan (Russia, 20th Century)

Sasha Moldovan (1901-1982), Street Scene, Oil on Board
17 East 80 St - #5
New York, NY, 10075
(212) 861-1953
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Sasha Moldovan (1901-1982), Street Scene, Oil on Board

Moldovan has applied thick layers of densely colored pigment to the canvas, creating a highly textured and luminous surface of impastoed dabs. His use of contrasting yet brilliant tonalities applied with breezy spontaneity in a series of short, rhythmic brushstrokes adds to the energetic intensity of the pictorial surface.

FRAMED: HEIGHT: 16 in | WIDTH: 16½ in

Origin Russia
Category Oils
Circadated 1954
Period 20th Century

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CONDITION: dated and located in France, framed in thick gold gilt antique style frame

THB REF: 4887071322


"Born to a Jewish family in Bessarabia om Imperial Russia, Moldovan pursued his artistic studies in Paris before emigrating to the U.S. He developed his highly expressionistic style while working with fellow colleagues from the Ecole de Paris, representing painters from Eastern Europe, Russia, Italy and Spain who came to work in France between the two world wars. These included the brilliant yet tormented painter Chaim Soutine as well as the innovative colorist Henri Matisse.
The noted art critic Maria Berg once said of Moldovan: 'Had Van Gogh painted Matisse's pictures while dreaming of Chagall, the result would have been the works of Moldovan.'"